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RULES

  1. Introduction
  2. MA Structure
  3. General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes
  4. Jurisdiction s
    1. 1.1 Definitions
    2. 1.2 Purpose of Rules
    3. 1.3 Repeal of Current Gcrs
    4. 1.4 by Laws
  5. Administration s
    1. 2.1 The Controlling Bodies
    2. 2.2 Sports Development Levy
    3. 2.3 Sports Development Account
    4. 2.4 Officials
  6. Licensing s
    1. 3.1 Licensing Requirements
    2. 3.2 Licensing General
    3. 3.3 Licensing Seniors
    4. 3.4 Licensing Juniors
    5. 3.5 Licensing Entrants
    6. 3.6 Licensing Speedway Mechanics
    7. 3.7 Licence Issuing And Renewals
    8. 3.8 Junior Coaching Program
  7. Competitions s
    1. 4.1 Venues
    2. 4.2 The Promotion And Conduct of Competitions
    3. 4.3 MA Events
    4. 4.4 Protocols
  8. Alternative Forms of Competition s
    1. 5.1 Alternative Activities
    2. 5.2 Venues Alternative Activities
    3. 5.3 Permits : Alternative Activities
    4. 5.4 Supplementary Regulations Alternative Activities
    5. 5.5 Licensing of Competitors Alternative Activities
    6. 5.6 Technical Specifications Alternative Activities
  9. Recreational Motorcycle Activity s
    1. 6.1 Purpose
    2. 6.2 Recreational Activities
    3. 6.3 Controlling Bodies Recreational Activities
    4. 6.4 Officials Recreational Activities
    5. 6.5 Venues Recreational Activities
    6. 6.6 The Promotion And Conduct of Recreational Activity
    7. 6.7 Permits Recreational Activities
    8. 6.8 Entries
    9. 6.9 Licensing of Participants
  10. Offences Protests And Appeals s
    1. 7.1 Offences
    2. 7.2 Protests
    3. 7.3 Appellate Bodies
    4. 7.4 Appeals
  11. Judicial Committee Guidelines s
    1. 8.1 MA Hearing Guidelines
  12. National Personal Accident Insurance s
    1. 12.1 Summary of Policy Coverage
    2. 12.2 Capital Benefits
    3. 12.3 Weekly Benefits
    4. 12.4 Definitions
  13. Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 13 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 13 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 13C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 13 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 13 E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SOLO CLASSES
    6. SECTION 13 F: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SIDECARS
    7. SECTION 13 G: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: JUNIOR CLASSES
    8. SECTION 13 H: MINIMOTO
  14. Historic Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 14 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 14 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 14 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 14 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: GENERAL
    5. SECTION 14E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: PERIOD
  15. Motocross And Supercross s
    1. SECTION 15 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 15 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 15 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 15 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  16. Classic Motocross And Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 16 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. Section 16 B Competition Classes
    3. SECTION 16 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 16 D TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  17. Enduro And Reliability Trials s
    1. SECTION 17A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 17B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 17C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 17D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 17E: AUSTRALIAN FOUR-DAY ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIPS
  18. ATV s
    1. SECTION 18A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 18B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 18C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 18D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  19. Speedway s
    1. SECTION 19A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 19B: AUSTRALIAN SPEEDWAY CHAMPIONSHIP
    3. SECTION 19C: AUSTRALIAN TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS
    4. SECTION 19D: COMPETITION RULES
    5. SECTION 19E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  20. Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 20A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 20B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 20C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 20D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  21. Track s
    1. SECTION 21A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 21B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 21C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 21D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  22. Supermoto s
    1. SECTION 22A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 22B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. Section 22c Competition Rules
    4. SECTION 22D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  23. Trial s
    1. SECTION 23A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP
    2. SECTION 23B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 23C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 23E: CLASS TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  24. Minikhana s
    1. SECTION 24A: MINIKHANA CLASSES
    2. SECTION 24B: COMPETITION RULES
    3. SECTION 24C: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    4. SECTION 24D: MINIKHANA COURSES
  25. Policies s
    1. 25.1 Member Protection Policy
    2. 25.2 Anti-doping Policy
    3. 25.3 Anti Match-fixing Policy
    4. 25.4 Privacy Regulation
    5. 25.5 Occupational Health and Safety Policy
    6. 25.6 Environmental Sustainability Policy
    7. 25.7 National Team Selection Policy

Rules

SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS


23.13 SOUND EMISSIONS

23.13.0.1 Sound testing must be carried out at all permitted events however it is not mandatory to test all machines.

23.13.1 Specifications

23.13.1.1 Sound emissions are set out in the tables below:

2 Metre Max method

DISCIPLINE LIMIT dB(A)
Trial 112 with a 4dB(A) allowance
23.13.1.2 Where government regulations or planning orders exist in relation to lower sound emissions or where a venue has lower sound emission requirements as part of the hire contract, the sound emission required will prevail over GCR 23.13.1.1.

23.13.2 Sound Control during Competition

23.13.2.1 The Sound Control Officer (SCO) must arrive in sufficient time for discussions with the Clerk of the Course and other Technical Officials in order that a suitable test site and testing policy can be agreed.
23.13.2.2 Machines can be tested before, or after competing in an event, chosen by ballot, or as required by a Steward, Clerk of Course or SCO.

23.13.3 Use of Sound Level Meters

23.13.3.1 Sound testing apparatus must:

  1. Comply with international standard IEC 651, Type 1 or Type 2.
  2. Include a compatible calibrator, which must be used immediately before testing begins and always just prior to a re-test if a disciplinary sanction may be imposed.
23.13.3.2 Sound testing apparatus must be set to:

  1. ‘Fast response’
  2. ‘A’ weighted,
  3. Select range High 80~130 dB,
  4. Activate the function MAX MIN – set on MAX,
23.13.3.3 ‘2 Metre Max’ Set up of the sound meter and the motorcycle:

  1. The sound levels will be measured with the sound meter/microphone fixed on a tripod, in the horizontal position, at the rear of the motorcycle.
  2. For the place and position of the motorcycle, ensure that there are no solid obstacles within a 10 meter radius of the microphone.
  3. The sound meter will be positioned at a distance of two metre behind the motorcycle, with an angle of 45° away from the centerline, on the exhaust side and at a height of 1.35 metre above the ground, with the sound meter level.
  4. The two metre distance is measured from the point where the centre of rear tyre touches the ground.
  5. It is preferred that the tests are conducted on soft ground, to prevent reverberation, i.e. grass or fine gravel.
  6. In other than moderate wind, machines should face forward in to the wind direction.
  7. The ambient sound level must remain lower than 100 dB(A).
23.13.3.4 ‘2 Metre Max’ Positioning of the motorcycle:

  1. The reference points:
    1. For a motorcycle: the contact point of the rear wheel on the ground.
    2. For motorcycles fitted with two exhaust outputs, the measurement will be made on the side of the air intake. If a central positioned air intake is used, both sides will be tested.
    3. For Sidecars: the contact point of the side wheel on the ground.
    4. For Quad vehicles: the vertical line to the ground from the centre point of the rear axle.
    5. For Quad vehicles with exhaust outlet moved from the median axis, the measurement will be made on the offset side. To make repetitive measurements, all motorcycles can be positioned into a small frame fixed on the ground.
23.13.3.5 ‘2 Metre Max’ method:

  1. The measurement is made with the motorcycle on its wheels, with a hot engine.
  2. During a sound test, machines not equipped with a gear box neutral must be placed on a stand.
  3. The SCO should stand beside the motorcycles, opposite the microphone and not screen or stand between the bike and the microphone. An assistant, placed on the left side of the motorcycle, shall disengage the clutch.
  4. The SCO shall open the throttle as fast as possible until full open throttle (instantly, within 0.3 seconds) and keep at max engine ‘rpm’ for at least one second. To end, the SCO will release the throttle quickly.
  5. If the result exceeds the limit, including ‘after fire’, the Inspector shall test the motorcycle a maximum of two more times.
  6. For motorcycles equipped with an engine rpm limiter, opening the throttle will be made – instantly, within 0.3 seconds – and kept open until at least one second has evolved and/or when there is an audible sign of over revving the engine.
  7. For motorcycles without an engine ‘rpm’ limiter, the opening of the throttle will have to be lower than two seconds and/or when there is an audible sign of over-revving the engine.
  8. If the engine tends to suffocate, close the throttle slightly and re-open the throttle.
  9. If detonations appear, the measurement must be started again.
  10. The numbers obtained from the test shall not be rounded down.
  11. For the sound level measurement, the handling of the throttle is limited only to the SCO, who shall open the throttle himself in order to minimize the influence by another operator (for that, it is helpful to have the microphone equipped with an extension cable to the sound meter).
23.13.3.6 Tests shall not take place in the rain

23.13.4 Machine Testing

23.13.4.1 If a machine fails, it can be represented for re-testing.
23.13.4.2 No person may compete in any event on a machine whose noise emissions exceed the prescribed levels.
23.13.4.3 A machine which does not comply with the sound limits can be presented several times.

23.14 FUEL

23.14.1 Fuel Warning

23.14.1.1 Fuels and lubricants are highly specialised substances and participants must be aware they may contain substances that are extremely dangerous to human health if misused, inhaled or allowed to contact skin.
23.14.1.2 Some of the components of fuel and lubricants are suspected of having the potential to cause cancer in rare circumstances.
23.14.1.3 The use of petrol as a general cleaning and washing agent is a common misuse of a potentially dangerous substance.
23.14.1.4 Fuels should be used and stored with extreme care and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

23.14.2 Fuel Testing

23.14.2.1 For any event, meeting or series, the relevant controlling body may direct that no fuels other than fuels of prescribed specifications and from a prescribed source may be used.

  1. Tests to ensure that only prescribed fuels are used in an event, meeting or series may be administered at any time and place during the course of the same,
  2. The Clerk of Course, Race Director or Chief Scrutineer may direct the administration of fuel tests.
23.14.2.2 Fuel tests must comply with the following procedures:

  1. All containers for holding samples must be clean and constructed of robust non-reactive impermeable material, must be sealable, and must have provision for identification,
  2. Equipment used for the extraction of fuel from machines must be clean and constructed of fuel non-reactive material,
  3. All samples must be divided into two lots (Sample A and Sample B) of not less than 5ml each, which must be placed in separate containers,
  4. Once samples are placed in containers, the containers must immediately be sealed and identified by reference to the machine from which the sample was taken. This information must be entered on a fuel sample certificate which must certify the date, place and time of taking the sample, the identity of the machine from which the sample was taken and the identity of the rider,
  5. Both samples must remain in the control of the official who administered the test.
  6. The rider or the representative must sign the fuel sample certificate acknowledging samples have been taken and are sealed,
  7. All samples held by the official must be delivered as soon as practicable after the competition to the relevant controlling body which must deliver the Sample A as soon as practicable to a laboratory approved by MA where they must be tested for content and quality in accordance with standard scientific procedures,
  8. The relevant controlling body must as soon as practicable after receipt of the results notify the rider or rider’s team representative and MA,
  9. If the rider is dissatisfied with the test result of Sample A, they may request Sample B be tested at an MA approved laboratory in their presence.

23.14.3 Refueling

23.14.3.1 During refueling, each machine must be stationary with the engine stopped.
23.14.3.2 Refueling will be deemed to have commenced when the fuel tank has been opened and completed when the tank is closed.
23.14.3.3 Smoking is strictly prohibited in areas where refueling is permitted.
23.14.3.4 Riders are liable for exclusion from an event for failing to adhere to GCR 23.14.3.3, and are responsible for the actions of their mechanics and support team members.

23.14.4 Homologation of Fuel

23.14.4.1 Unleaded fuel produced by an oil company for sale in the Australian general transport fuel market through retail petrol pumps in at least five states does not have to be homologated. For the avoidance of doubt this means the fuel must be available for sale on demand from a roadside bowser outlet at each of at least five separate service stations in each of at least five Australian states or territories.
23.14.4.2 Organisations seeking homologation of fuel must provide MA with:

  1. Two one-litre sealed containers of the fuel for analysis,
  2. Details of the fuels characteristics,
  3. The distribution network,
  4. The price structure,
  5. A homologation fee of $2,500 in the first year and $2,000 per year thereafter.
23.14.4.3 Fuels approved under this GCR will be published at www.ma.org.au .

23.14.5 Fuel: Trial

23.14.5.1 Fuel for machines other than Classic competition must:.

  1. Be unleaded, and
  2. Be no more than 100 RON,
  3. Contain no additives other than those added at the point of manufacture except for lubricating oil for 2-stroke engines.
  4. Be readily available from retail petrol pumps within Australia, or
  5. Be a brand of fuel homologated by MA that is compatible with the “Fuel Quality Standards Act 2000”.
23.14.5.2 Fuel for Classic Trial must be:

  1. As per GCR 23.14.5.1, or
  2. Leaded fuel, providing that:
  3. The fuel is purchased from suppliers approved by Environment Australia.

23.15 ENGINES

23.15.1 Reciprocating Engines

23.15.1.1 The Formula for calculation of capacities and classes

Cubic capacity = (D2 x 3.1416 x C x N)
4

Where:

D = Bore in centimetres,
C = stroke in centimetres,
N = Number of cylinders.

23.15.2 Engine Capacity Tolerances

23.15.2.1 The actual engine capacity of a machine competing in a capacity class may not exceed the prescribed capacity for that class by more than 2%.

23.16 FRAMES AND PARTS

23.16.1 Fuel Tanks

23.16.1.1 Fuel tanks may be constructed from any material that has been approved by the Australian Standards Association as a petrol or fuel container material.

23.16.2 Tyres

23.16.2.1 Tyres must comply with the following:

  1. Metal studs, spikes, chain, rope or other non-skid attachments may not be used unless permitted by the relevant supplementary regulations.
  2. Treads on tyres must be at least 1mm deep on any part of the tyre that comes in contact with the ground.
  3. Paddle or scoop treaded tyres may not be fitted.
23.16.2.2 Valve caps must be used for all competitions.

23.16.3 Tyre Types

23.16.3.1 With the exception of mini-bikes and the sidecar tyres of sidecars, tyres must be of a Trial Universal pattern on all machines.

23.16.4 Ignition Cut-Out Switch

23.16.4.1 All machines must be fitted with an effective ignition cut-out switch operating on the primary circuit secured to the handlebars and attached by a lanyard to the rider while the machine is in operation such that a separation of the machine and rider will activate the ignition cut-out circuit.

23.16.5 Design and Dimensions

23.16.5.1 When brake cam arms or levers are of open or hooked type, the brake actuating rod or cable must be secured so as to prevent accidental dislodgement.

23.16.6 Centre and Side Stands

23.16.6.1 Centre and side stands may remain on machines for Trial.
23.16.6.2 Centre and side stands must be secured in the closed position.

23.16.7 Kick Start Levers

23.16.7.1 Kick start levers, other than transverse, must be folding.

23.16.8 Mudguards

23.16.8.1 Either a rear mudguard or a seat must be fitted which extends at least 20 degrees to the rear of a vertical line drawn through the rear wheel axle.
23.16.8.2 Mudguards must be made of a material, which is not liable to cause personal injury if deformed.

23.16.9 Footrests

23.16.9.1 Footrests must:

  1. Be well rounded and designed so as to ensure that no dangerous edges are created due to wear.
  2. Not touch the ground at lean unless they are hinged or pivoted and controlled by a return spring.

23.16.10 Handlebars

23.16.10.1 The ends of the handlebars or twist grip sleeves must be securely plugged so as to present a flush or rounded end.
23.16.10.2 Handlebar levers must:

  1. Have ball ends with a minimum diameter of:
    1. 15mm, for levers longer than 76mm,
    2. 10mm, for levers shorter than 76mm.
  2. Measure no more than 200mm from the fulcrum to the extremity of the ball.
23.16.10.3 Throttle controls must be self-closing.

23.16.11 Drive Chain Protection

23.16.11.1 Primary drives (the drive connecting engine to clutch) must be guarded so as to prevent direct access to the chain or sprockets with the fingers.
23.16.11.2 The guard must be constructed of:

  1. Metal having a minimum thickness of 1.6mm, which may be mesh or expanded metal provided the openings do not exceed 10mm, or
  2. Fibreglass having a minimum thickness of 3mm.
23.16.11.3 If a plastic, fibreglass or part open chain guard is used, a steel bolt of not less than 10mm diameter, placed outside the bottom rear quadrant of the clutch sprocket. This bolt, if damaged, must be replaced.
23.16.11.4 Projecting sprockets, which are not behind a clutch assembly or directly behind a frame member, must be guarded where the sprocket teeth are further than 30mm from a frame member or swinging arm.
23.16.11.5 A counter shaft sprocket which is more than 30mm from the outside of the swing arm pivot, must be covered.
23.16.11.6 A chain guard made of suitable material must be fitted in a way to prevent trapping between the lower drive chain run and the final drive sprocket at the rear wheel.

23.16.12 Exhaust Systems

23.16.12.1 Exhaust systems must:

  1. Be fitted with silencers,
  2. Terminate at a point not more than 25mm beyond the rear extremity of the rear tyre tread,
  3. Be attached as closely as practicable to the machine and in a manner that does not, in the opinion of the Scrutineer, create a hazard to other competitors,
  4. Where separate silencers are fitted, have a minimum of two mountings or locking screws on all machines which have a capacity in excess of 85cc,
  5. Where silencers are re-packable, have safety wired securing bolts.

SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS


23.13 SOUND EMISSIONS

23.13.0.1 Sound testing must be carried out at all permitted events however it is not mandatory to test all machines.

23.13.1 Specifications

23.13.1.1 Sound emissions are set out in the tables below:

2 Metre Max method

DISCIPLINE LIMIT dB(A)
Trial 112 with a 4dB(A) allowance
23.13.1.2 Where government regulations or planning orders exist in relation to lower sound emissions or where a venue has lower sound emission requirements as part of the hire contract, the sound emission required will prevail over GCR 23.13.1.1.

23.13.2 Sound Control during Competition

23.13.2.1 The Sound Control Officer (SCO) must arrive in sufficient time for discussions with the Clerk of the Course and other Technical Officials in order that a suitable test site and testing policy can be agreed.
23.13.2.2 Machines can be tested before, or after competing in an event, chosen by ballot, or as required by a Steward, Clerk of Course or SCO.

23.13.3 Use of Sound Level Meters

23.13.3.1 Sound testing apparatus must:

  1. Comply with international standard IEC 651, Type 1 or Type 2.
  2. Include a compatible calibrator, which must be used immediately before testing begins and always just prior to a re-test if a disciplinary sanction may be imposed.
23.13.3.2 Sound testing apparatus must be set to:

  1. ‘Fast response’
  2. ‘A’ weighted,
  3. Select range High 80~130 dB,
  4. Activate the function MAX MIN – set on MAX,
23.13.3.3 ‘2 Metre Max’ Set up of the sound meter and the motorcycle:

  1. The sound levels will be measured with the sound meter/microphone fixed on a tripod, in the horizontal position, at the rear of the motorcycle.
  2. For the place and position of the motorcycle, ensure that there are no solid obstacles within a 10 meter radius of the microphone.
  3. The sound meter will be positioned at a distance of two metre behind the motorcycle, with an angle of 45° away from the centerline, on the exhaust side and at a height of 1.35 metre above the ground, with the sound meter level.
  4. The two metre distance is measured from the point where the centre of rear tyre touches the ground.
  5. It is preferred that the tests are conducted on soft ground, to prevent reverberation, i.e. grass or fine gravel.
  6. In other than moderate wind, machines should face forward in to the wind direction.
  7. The ambient sound level must remain lower than 100 dB(A).
23.13.3.4 ‘2 Metre Max’ Positioning of the motorcycle:

  1. The reference points:
    1. For a motorcycle: the contact point of the rear wheel on the ground.
    2. For motorcycles fitted with two exhaust outputs, the measurement will be made on the side of the air intake. If a central positioned air intake is used, both sides will be tested.
    3. For Sidecars: the contact point of the side wheel on the ground.
    4. For Quad vehicles: the vertical line to the ground from the centre point of the rear axle.
    5. For Quad vehicles with exhaust outlet moved from the median axis, the measurement will be made on the offset side. To make repetitive measurements, all motorcycles can be positioned into a small frame fixed on the ground.
23.13.3.5 ‘2 Metre Max’ method:

  1. The measurement is made with the motorcycle on its wheels, with a hot engine.
  2. During a sound test, machines not equipped with a gear box neutral must be placed on a stand.
  3. The SCO should stand beside the motorcycles, opposite the microphone and not screen or stand between the bike and the microphone. An assistant, placed on the left side of the motorcycle, shall disengage the clutch.
  4. The SCO shall open the throttle as fast as possible until full open throttle (instantly, within 0.3 seconds) and keep at max engine ‘rpm’ for at least one second. To end, the SCO will release the throttle quickly.
  5. If the result exceeds the limit, including ‘after fire’, the Inspector shall test the motorcycle a maximum of two more times.
  6. For motorcycles equipped with an engine rpm limiter, opening the throttle will be made – instantly, within 0.3 seconds – and kept open until at least one second has evolved and/or when there is an audible sign of over revving the engine.
  7. For motorcycles without an engine ‘rpm’ limiter, the opening of the throttle will have to be lower than two seconds and/or when there is an audible sign of over-revving the engine.
  8. If the engine tends to suffocate, close the throttle slightly and re-open the throttle.
  9. If detonations appear, the measurement must be started again.
  10. The numbers obtained from the test shall not be rounded down.
  11. For the sound level measurement, the handling of the throttle is limited only to the SCO, who shall open the throttle himself in order to minimize the influence by another operator (for that, it is helpful to have the microphone equipped with an extension cable to the sound meter).
23.13.3.6 Tests shall not take place in the rain

23.13.4 Machine Testing

23.13.4.1 If a machine fails, it can be represented for re-testing.
23.13.4.2 No person may compete in any event on a machine whose noise emissions exceed the prescribed levels.
23.13.4.3 A machine which does not comply with the sound limits can be presented several times.

23.14 FUEL

23.14.1 Fuel Warning

23.14.1.1 Fuels and lubricants are highly specialised substances and participants must be aware they may contain substances that are extremely dangerous to human health if misused, inhaled or allowed to contact skin.
23.14.1.2 Some of the components of fuel and lubricants are suspected of having the potential to cause cancer in rare circumstances.
23.14.1.3 The use of petrol as a general cleaning and washing agent is a common misuse of a potentially dangerous substance.
23.14.1.4 Fuels should be used and stored with extreme care and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

23.14.2 Fuel Testing

23.14.2.1 For any event, meeting or series, the relevant controlling body may direct that no fuels other than fuels of prescribed specifications and from a prescribed source may be used.

  1. Tests to ensure that only prescribed fuels are used in an event, meeting or series may be administered at any time and place during the course of the same,
  2. The Clerk of Course, Race Director or Chief Scrutineer may direct the administration of fuel tests.
23.14.2.2 Fuel tests must comply with the following procedures:

  1. All containers for holding samples must be clean and constructed of robust non-reactive impermeable material, must be sealable, and must have provision for identification,
  2. Equipment used for the extraction of fuel from machines must be clean and constructed of fuel non-reactive material,
  3. All samples must be divided into two lots (Sample A and Sample B) of not less than 5ml each, which must be placed in separate containers,
  4. Once samples are placed in containers, the containers must immediately be sealed and identified by reference to the machine from which the sample was taken. This information must be entered on a fuel sample certificate which must certify the date, place and time of taking the sample, the identity of the machine from which the sample was taken and the identity of the rider,
  5. Both samples must remain in the control of the official who administered the test.
  6. The rider or the representative must sign the fuel sample certificate acknowledging samples have been taken and are sealed,
  7. All samples held by the official must be delivered as soon as practicable after the competition to the relevant controlling body which must deliver the Sample A as soon as practicable to a laboratory approved by MA where they must be tested for content and quality in accordance with standard scientific procedures,
  8. The relevant controlling body must as soon as practicable after receipt of the results notify the rider or rider’s team representative and MA,
  9. If the rider is dissatisfied with the test result of Sample A, they may request Sample B be tested at an MA approved laboratory in their presence.

23.14.3 Refueling

23.14.3.1 During refueling, each machine must be stationary with the engine stopped.
23.14.3.2 Refueling will be deemed to have commenced when the fuel tank has been opened and completed when the tank is closed.
23.14.3.3 Smoking is strictly prohibited in areas where refueling is permitted.
23.14.3.4 Riders are liable for exclusion from an event for failing to adhere to GCR 23.14.3.3, and are responsible for the actions of their mechanics and support team members.

23.14.4 Homologation of Fuel

23.14.4.1 Unleaded fuel produced by an oil company for sale in the Australian general transport fuel market through retail petrol pumps in at least five states does not have to be homologated. For the avoidance of doubt this means the fuel must be available for sale on demand from a roadside bowser outlet at each of at least five separate service stations in each of at least five Australian states or territories.
23.14.4.2 Organisations seeking homologation of fuel must provide MA with:

  1. Two one-litre sealed containers of the fuel for analysis,
  2. Details of the fuels characteristics,
  3. The distribution network,
  4. The price structure,
  5. A homologation fee of $2,500 in the first year and $2,000 per year thereafter.
23.14.4.3 Fuels approved under this GCR will be published at www.ma.org.au .

23.14.5 Fuel: Trial

23.14.5.1 Fuel for machines other than Classic competition must:.

  1. Be unleaded, and
  2. Be no more than 100 RON,
  3. Contain no additives other than those added at the point of manufacture except for lubricating oil for 2-stroke engines.
  4. Be readily available from retail petrol pumps within Australia, or
  5. Be a brand of fuel homologated by MA that is compatible with the “Fuel Quality Standards Act 2000”.
23.14.5.2 Fuel for Classic Trial must be:

  1. As per GCR 23.14.5.1, or
  2. Leaded fuel, providing that:
  3. The fuel is purchased from suppliers approved by Environment Australia.

23.15 ENGINES

23.15.1 Reciprocating Engines

23.15.1.1 The Formula for calculation of capacities and classes

Cubic capacity = (D2 x 3.1416 x C x N)
4

Where:

D = Bore in centimetres,
C = stroke in centimetres,
N = Number of cylinders.

23.15.2 Engine Capacity Tolerances

23.15.2.1 The actual engine capacity of a machine competing in a capacity class may not exceed the prescribed capacity for that class by more than 2%.

23.16 FRAMES AND PARTS

23.16.1 Fuel Tanks

23.16.1.1 Fuel tanks may be constructed from any material that has been approved by the Australian Standards Association as a petrol or fuel container material.

23.16.2 Tyres

23.16.2.1 Tyres must comply with the following:

  1. Metal studs, spikes, chain, rope or other non-skid attachments may not be used unless permitted by the relevant supplementary regulations.
  2. Treads on tyres must be at least 1mm deep on any part of the tyre that comes in contact with the ground.
  3. Paddle or scoop treaded tyres may not be fitted.
23.16.2.2 Valve caps must be used for all competitions.

23.16.3 Tyre Types

23.16.3.1 With the exception of mini-bikes and the sidecar tyres of sidecars, tyres must be of a Trial Universal pattern on all machines.

23.16.4 Ignition Cut-Out Switch

23.16.4.1 All machines must be fitted with an effective ignition cut-out switch operating on the primary circuit secured to the handlebars and attached by a lanyard to the rider while the machine is in operation such that a separation of the machine and rider will activate the ignition cut-out circuit.

23.16.5 Design and Dimensions

23.16.5.1 When brake cam arms or levers are of open or hooked type, the brake actuating rod or cable must be secured so as to prevent accidental dislodgement.

23.16.6 Centre and Side Stands

23.16.6.1 Centre and side stands may remain on machines for Trial.
23.16.6.2 Centre and side stands must be secured in the closed position.

23.16.7 Kick Start Levers

23.16.7.1 Kick start levers, other than transverse, must be folding.

23.16.8 Mudguards

23.16.8.1 Either a rear mudguard or a seat must be fitted which extends at least 20 degrees to the rear of a vertical line drawn through the rear wheel axle.
23.16.8.2 Mudguards must be made of a material, which is not liable to cause personal injury if deformed.

23.16.9 Footrests

23.16.9.1 Footrests must:

  1. Be well rounded and designed so as to ensure that no dangerous edges are created due to wear.
  2. Not touch the ground at lean unless they are hinged or pivoted and controlled by a return spring.

23.16.10 Handlebars

23.16.10.1 The ends of the handlebars or twist grip sleeves must be securely plugged so as to present a flush or rounded end.
23.16.10.2 Handlebar levers must:

  1. Have ball ends with a minimum diameter of:
    1. 15mm, for levers longer than 76mm,
    2. 10mm, for levers shorter than 76mm.
  2. Measure no more than 200mm from the fulcrum to the extremity of the ball.
23.16.10.3 Throttle controls must be self-closing.

23.16.11 Drive Chain Protection

23.16.11.1 Primary drives (the drive connecting engine to clutch) must be guarded so as to prevent direct access to the chain or sprockets with the fingers.
23.16.11.2 The guard must be constructed of:

  1. Metal having a minimum thickness of 1.6mm, which may be mesh or expanded metal provided the openings do not exceed 10mm, or
  2. Fibreglass having a minimum thickness of 3mm.
23.16.11.3 If a plastic, fibreglass or part open chain guard is used, a steel bolt of not less than 10mm diameter, placed outside the bottom rear quadrant of the clutch sprocket. This bolt, if damaged, must be replaced.
23.16.11.4 Projecting sprockets, which are not behind a clutch assembly or directly behind a frame member, must be guarded where the sprocket teeth are further than 30mm from a frame member or swinging arm.
23.16.11.5 A counter shaft sprocket which is more than 30mm from the outside of the swing arm pivot, must be covered.
23.16.11.6 A chain guard made of suitable material must be fitted in a way to prevent trapping between the lower drive chain run and the final drive sprocket at the rear wheel.

23.16.12 Exhaust Systems

23.16.12.1 Exhaust systems must:

  1. Be fitted with silencers,
  2. Terminate at a point not more than 25mm beyond the rear extremity of the rear tyre tread,
  3. Be attached as closely as practicable to the machine and in a manner that does not, in the opinion of the Scrutineer, create a hazard to other competitors,
  4. Where separate silencers are fitted, have a minimum of two mountings or locking screws on all machines which have a capacity in excess of 85cc,
  5. Where silencers are re-packable, have safety wired securing bolts.