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RULES

  1. Introduction
  2. MA Structure
  3. General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes
  4. Jurisdiction s
    1. 1.1 Definitions
    2. 1.2 Purpose of Rules
    3. 1.3 Repeal of Current Gcrs
    4. 1.4 by Laws
  5. Administration s
    1. 2.1 The Controlling Bodies
    2. 2.2 Sports Development Levy
    3. 2.3 Sports Development Account
    4. 2.4 Officials
  6. Licensing s
    1. 3.1 Licensing Requirements
    2. 3.2 Licensing General
    3. 3.3 Licensing Seniors
    4. 3.4 Licensing Juniors
    5. 3.5 Licensing Entrants
    6. 3.6 Licensing Speedway Mechanics
    7. 3.7 Licence Issuing And Renewals
    8. 3.8 Junior Coaching Program
  7. Competitions s
    1. 4.1 Venues
    2. 4.2 The Promotion And Conduct of Competitions
    3. 4.3 MA Events
    4. 4.4 Protocols
  8. Alternative Forms of Competition s
    1. 5.1 Alternative Activities
    2. 5.2 Venues Alternative Activities
    3. 5.3 Permits : Alternative Activities
    4. 5.4 Supplementary Regulations Alternative Activities
    5. 5.5 Licensing of Competitors Alternative Activities
    6. 5.6 Technical Specifications Alternative Activities
  9. Recreational Motorcycle Activity s
    1. 6.1 Purpose
    2. 6.2 Recreational Activities
    3. 6.3 Controlling Bodies Recreational Activities
    4. 6.4 Officials Recreational Activities
    5. 6.5 Venues Recreational Activities
    6. 6.6 The Promotion And Conduct of Recreational Activity
    7. 6.7 Permits Recreational Activities
    8. 6.8 Entries
    9. 6.9 Licensing of Participants
  10. Offences Protests And Appeals s
    1. 7.1 Offences
    2. 7.2 Protests
    3. 7.3 Appellate Bodies
    4. 7.4 Appeals
  11. Judicial Committee Guidelines s
    1. 8.1 MA Hearing Guidelines
  12. National Personal Accident Insurance s
    1. 12.1 Summary of Policy Coverage
    2. 12.2 Capital Benefits
    3. 12.3 Weekly Benefits
    4. 12.4 Definitions
  13. Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 13 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 13 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 13C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 13 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 13 E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SOLO CLASSES
    6. SECTION 13 F: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SIDECARS
    7. SECTION 13 G: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: JUNIOR CLASSES
    8. SECTION 13 H: MINIMOTO
  14. Historic Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 14 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 14 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 14 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 14 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: GENERAL
    5. SECTION 14E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: PERIOD
  15. Motocross And Supercross s
    1. SECTION 15 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 15 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 15 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 15 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  16. Classic Motocross And Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 16 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. Section 16 B Competition Classes
    3. SECTION 16 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 16 D TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  17. Enduro And Reliability Trials s
    1. SECTION 17A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 17B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 17C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 17D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 17E: AUSTRALIAN FOUR-DAY ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIPS
  18. ATV s
    1. SECTION 18A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 18B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 18C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 18D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  19. Speedway s
    1. SECTION 19A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 19B: AUSTRALIAN SPEEDWAY CHAMPIONSHIP
    3. SECTION 19C: AUSTRALIAN TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS
    4. SECTION 19D: COMPETITION RULES
    5. SECTION 19E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  20. Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 20A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 20B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 20C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 20D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  21. Track s
    1. SECTION 21A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 21B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 21C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 21D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  22. Supermoto s
    1. SECTION 22A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 22B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. Section 22c Competition Rules
    4. SECTION 22D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  23. Trial s
    1. SECTION 23A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP
    2. SECTION 23B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 23C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 23E: CLASS TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  24. Minikhana s
    1. SECTION 24A: MINIKHANA CLASSES
    2. SECTION 24B: COMPETITION RULES
    3. SECTION 24C: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    4. SECTION 24D: MINIKHANA COURSES
  25. Policies s
    1. 25.1 Member Protection Policy
    2. 25.2 Anti-doping Policy
    3. 25.3 Anti Match-fixing Policy
    4. 25.4 Privacy Regulation
    5. 25.5 Occupational Health and Safety Policy
    6. 25.6 Environmental Sustainability Policy
    7. 25.7 National Team Selection Policy

Rules

Structure


Motorcycling Australia (MA) is the governing body of motorcycle sport in Australia.
In any sport, it is essential to have rules regulating its conduct. This is particularly so in the case of motorcycling, where safety is vital for participants and spectators.
This book of rules, referred to as the Manual of Motorcycle Sport (MoMS), the GCRs, the Rule Book, and sometimes ‘The Bible’ variously, forms the basis of a contract between the regulating bodies of the sport and those who participate in it, namely licence holders, promoters and the clubs.
Our rules must be fair, they must confer on officials a clearly defined discretion to ensure that they are applied fairly, and must be observed by all. As the technology of our sport is constantly changing and developing so must our rules adapt to change.

MA’s core business

MA’s core business is to develop and apply the rules and regulations of the sport and represent you, our 25,000 members Australia-wide.
MA operates within the framework of local, State and Commonwealth Government legislation and regulations and is affiliated with the international governing body, Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), based in Geneva, Switzerland.
MA is a Federation with seven voting members, comprising State Controlling Bodies (SCBs) from all States and Territories except the ACT. MA’s National Council is made up of one delegate from each SCB, usually the SCB President. The Council elects 4 Directors to the MA Board, which in turn appoints 2 independent Directors.
MA’s has a full-time National Office in Melbourne as do most of the SCBs around Australia. All are available to help keen riders enjoy their sport to the full.

Responsibilities

In addition to electing the Board, the MA National Council is responsible for policy development and strategic direction.
The MA Board is responsible for implementing and reviewing the adopted Strategic Plan, governance and appointing suitable people to join Commissions and Committees. The CEO is employed to manage the organisation. Commissions are mainly discipline-specific and exist to develop recommendations for the management of a particular area of the sport. They have been established across the spectrum of motorcycle sport, including Road Racing, Motocross & Supercross, Speedway,Track & Dirt Track, Enduro, Trials, Classic Motocross, Historic Road Racing, Juniors and Women.

Administration of the sport

Motorcycle sport is administered under the doctrine of “Relevant Controlling Bodies”. The FIM is responsible for international competitions, MA for Australian Championships and series, and the SCBs control state and club competitions. Although each SCB is autonomous and incorporated in its own State, both MA and SCBs have a mutual reliance for the efficient management of the sport. MA and the SCBs administer all competitions under common rules and the SCBs have delegated authority to licence competitions, venues and control the sport at State/Territory level.
Together with their organisational roles, MA and SCBs are concerned with the well-being of riders, officials, venue and track standards, risk management, all aspects of safety, the administration of safe, free and fair competition in accordance with the principles of natural justice and the development of the sport in Australia.

Clubs

Clubs are the smallest, but one of the most important units of organisation in our sport. They often provide the face-to-face contact that encourages people to join motorcycle sport. They have also traditionally provided a social aspect which makes our sport, in particular one which attracts people and often keeps them involved for entire lifetimes.

Competitors

Competitors are the life-blood of Motorcycling Australia. Without your involvement and enthusiasm, there would be no sport.

Volunteers

Competitors, administrators, spectators, sponsors and government authorities are all important elements of the successful running of a sport. One of the most overlooked groups – volunteers – is of fundamental importance.ma_structure2
Volunteers fulfill the majority of roles and responsibilities in the function of every day motorcycle sport. The many organisations delivering sport and recreation services and the volunteers that create and sustain these organisations make a vital contribution to the needs of the community.
Without volunteer support, our sport would not exist. It is also true that the volunteers receive the least recognition or reward for their time and effort. Competitors enjoy the excitement of competition and the opportunity to win prizes; sponsors receive increased recognition for their brand or product; and a professional administrator or promoter can realise a profit.
Volunteers do it for the love of the sport, so we acknowledge the contribution that you make to motorcycle sport in Australia and greatly appreciate your time and effort given.
MA and the SCBs conduct courses in Officiating and Coaching and have support services to assist volunteer involvement in motorcycle sport.
We would encourage anyone interested in becoming involved in motorcycle sport to contact a club.

Structure


Motorcycling Australia (MA) is the governing body of motorcycle sport in Australia.
In any sport, it is essential to have rules regulating its conduct. This is particularly so in the case of motorcycling, where safety is vital for participants and spectators.
This book of rules, referred to as the Manual of Motorcycle Sport (MoMS), the GCRs, the Rule Book, and sometimes ‘The Bible’ variously, forms the basis of a contract between the regulating bodies of the sport and those who participate in it, namely licence holders, promoters and the clubs.
Our rules must be fair, they must confer on officials a clearly defined discretion to ensure that they are applied fairly, and must be observed by all. As the technology of our sport is constantly changing and developing so must our rules adapt to change.

MA’s core business

MA’s core business is to develop and apply the rules and regulations of the sport and represent you, our 25,000 members Australia-wide.
MA operates within the framework of local, State and Commonwealth Government legislation and regulations and is affiliated with the international governing body, Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), based in Geneva, Switzerland.
MA is a Federation with seven voting members, comprising State Controlling Bodies (SCBs) from all States and Territories except the ACT. MA’s National Council is made up of one delegate from each SCB, usually the SCB President. The Council elects 4 Directors to the MA Board, which in turn appoints 2 independent Directors.
MA’s has a full-time National Office in Melbourne as do most of the SCBs around Australia. All are available to help keen riders enjoy their sport to the full.

Responsibilities

In addition to electing the Board, the MA National Council is responsible for policy development and strategic direction.
The MA Board is responsible for implementing and reviewing the adopted Strategic Plan, governance and appointing suitable people to join Commissions and Committees. The CEO is employed to manage the organisation. Commissions are mainly discipline-specific and exist to develop recommendations for the management of a particular area of the sport. They have been established across the spectrum of motorcycle sport, including Road Racing, Motocross & Supercross, Speedway,Track & Dirt Track, Enduro, Trials, Classic Motocross, Historic Road Racing, Juniors and Women.

Administration of the sport

Motorcycle sport is administered under the doctrine of “Relevant Controlling Bodies”. The FIM is responsible for international competitions, MA for Australian Championships and series, and the SCBs control state and club competitions. Although each SCB is autonomous and incorporated in its own State, both MA and SCBs have a mutual reliance for the efficient management of the sport. MA and the SCBs administer all competitions under common rules and the SCBs have delegated authority to licence competitions, venues and control the sport at State/Territory level.
Together with their organisational roles, MA and SCBs are concerned with the well-being of riders, officials, venue and track standards, risk management, all aspects of safety, the administration of safe, free and fair competition in accordance with the principles of natural justice and the development of the sport in Australia.

Clubs

Clubs are the smallest, but one of the most important units of organisation in our sport. They often provide the face-to-face contact that encourages people to join motorcycle sport. They have also traditionally provided a social aspect which makes our sport, in particular one which attracts people and often keeps them involved for entire lifetimes.

Competitors

Competitors are the life-blood of Motorcycling Australia. Without your involvement and enthusiasm, there would be no sport.

Volunteers

Competitors, administrators, spectators, sponsors and government authorities are all important elements of the successful running of a sport. One of the most overlooked groups – volunteers – is of fundamental importance.ma_structure2
Volunteers fulfill the majority of roles and responsibilities in the function of every day motorcycle sport. The many organisations delivering sport and recreation services and the volunteers that create and sustain these organisations make a vital contribution to the needs of the community.
Without volunteer support, our sport would not exist. It is also true that the volunteers receive the least recognition or reward for their time and effort. Competitors enjoy the excitement of competition and the opportunity to win prizes; sponsors receive increased recognition for their brand or product; and a professional administrator or promoter can realise a profit.
Volunteers do it for the love of the sport, so we acknowledge the contribution that you make to motorcycle sport in Australia and greatly appreciate your time and effort given.
MA and the SCBs conduct courses in Officiating and Coaching and have support services to assist volunteer involvement in motorcycle sport.
We would encourage anyone interested in becoming involved in motorcycle sport to contact a club.