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RULES

  1. Introduction
  2. MA Structure
  3. General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes
  4. Jurisdiction s
    1. 1.1 Definitions
    2. 1.2 Purpose of Rules
    3. 1.3 Repeal of Current Gcrs
    4. 1.4 by Laws
  5. Administration s
    1. 2.1 The Controlling Bodies
    2. 2.2 Sports Development Levy
    3. 2.3 Sports Development Account
    4. 2.4 Officials
  6. Licensing s
    1. 3.1 Licensing Requirements
    2. 3.2 Licensing General
    3. 3.3 Licensing Seniors
    4. 3.4 Licensing Juniors
    5. 3.5 Licensing Entrants
    6. 3.6 Licensing Speedway Mechanics
    7. 3.7 Licence Issuing And Renewals
    8. 3.8 Junior Coaching Program
  7. Competitions s
    1. 4.1 Venues
    2. 4.2 The Promotion And Conduct of Competitions
    3. 4.3 MA Events
    4. 4.4 Protocols
  8. Alternative Forms of Competition s
    1. 5.1 Alternative Activities
    2. 5.2 Venues Alternative Activities
    3. 5.3 Permits : Alternative Activities
    4. 5.4 Supplementary Regulations Alternative Activities
    5. 5.5 Licensing of Competitors Alternative Activities
    6. 5.6 Technical Specifications Alternative Activities
  9. Recreational Motorcycle Activity s
    1. 6.1 Purpose
    2. 6.2 Recreational Activities
    3. 6.3 Controlling Bodies Recreational Activities
    4. 6.4 Officials Recreational Activities
    5. 6.5 Venues Recreational Activities
    6. 6.6 The Promotion And Conduct of Recreational Activity
    7. 6.7 Permits Recreational Activities
    8. 6.8 Entries
    9. 6.9 Licensing of Participants
  10. Offences Protests And Appeals s
    1. 7.1 Offences
    2. 7.2 Protests
    3. 7.3 Appellate Bodies
    4. 7.4 Appeals
  11. Judicial Committee Guidelines s
    1. 8.1 MA Hearing Guidelines
  12. National Personal Accident Insurance s
    1. 12.1 Summary of Policy Coverage
    2. 12.2 Capital Benefits
    3. 12.3 Weekly Benefits
    4. 12.4 Definitions
  13. Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 13 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 13 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 13C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 13 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 13 E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SOLO CLASSES
    6. SECTION 13 F: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SIDECARS
    7. SECTION 13 G: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: JUNIOR CLASSES
    8. SECTION 13 H: MINIMOTO
  14. Historic Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 14 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 14 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 14 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 14 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: GENERAL
    5. SECTION 14E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: PERIOD
  15. Motocross And Supercross s
    1. SECTION 15 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 15 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 15 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 15 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  16. Classic Motocross And Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 16 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. Section 16 B Competition Classes
    3. SECTION 16 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 16 D TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  17. Enduro And Reliability Trials s
    1. SECTION 17A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 17B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 17C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 17D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 17E: AUSTRALIAN FOUR-DAY ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIPS
  18. ATV s
    1. SECTION 18A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 18B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 18C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 18D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  19. Speedway s
    1. SECTION 19A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 19B: AUSTRALIAN SPEEDWAY CHAMPIONSHIP
    3. SECTION 19C: AUSTRALIAN TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS
    4. SECTION 19D: COMPETITION RULES
    5. SECTION 19E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  20. Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 20A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 20B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 20C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 20D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  21. Track s
    1. SECTION 21A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 21B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 21C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 21D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  22. Supermoto s
    1. SECTION 22A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 22B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. Section 22c Competition Rules
    4. SECTION 22D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  23. Trial s
    1. SECTION 23A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP
    2. SECTION 23B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 23C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 23E: CLASS TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  24. Minikhana s
    1. SECTION 24A: MINIKHANA CLASSES
    2. SECTION 24B: COMPETITION RULES
    3. SECTION 24C: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    4. SECTION 24D: MINIKHANA COURSES
  25. Policies s
    1. 25.1 Member Protection Policy
    2. 25.2 Anti-doping Policy
    3. 25.3 Anti Match-fixing Policy
    4. 25.4 Privacy Regulation
    5. 25.5 Occupational Health and Safety Policy
    6. 25.6 Environmental Sustainability Policy
    7. 25.7 National Team Selection Policy

Rules

Introduction


INTRODUCTION TO THE 2017 EDITION

 

Welcome to Motorcycling Australia’s 2017 Manual of Motorcycle Sport (MoMS), a publication designed to assist you in your riding or officiating throughout the upcoming calendar year.

The Manual of Motorcycle Sport

The MoMS is the motorcycle racing ‘Bible’ and the development and provision of the rules and information within this resource is one of the key functions of Motorcycling Australia (MA). While the information is correct at the time of printing, things can and do change through-out the year. For this reason we urge you to keep an eye on the MA website, where bulletins and updated versions are posted as necessary (www.ma.org.au).

The PDF version of the manual is optimized for use on all your devices for access to the MoMS anywhere, anytime. You have the option to utilize the manual offline, with content available chapter by chapter to download, save and print as required.

As you review this years’ publication of MA’s General Competition Rules, you will notice a number of changes. There has been additional streamlining between chapters, and the inclusion of an easy to use Appendix for sound emissions and fuel. This can be found directly after Chapter 22 and makes a review of the requirements stress-free. This evolution of the MoMS, which will continue to develop into 2018, will make finding the right information much simpler. The structural changes may mean that a particular rule is not where it used to     be but rest assured it will be there and the updated chapter content lists are now even better at directing   you to where specific rules are located. The example of Supplementary Regulations has also been moved exclusively online to ensure everyone has access to the most up-to-date versions. This can be found at www.ma.org.au or contact the MA office for more information.

As a resource for use at events and in all aspects of associated officiating duties, a limited run of printed  hard copy manuals will be distributed to Level 4 Officials. Printed manuals will also be available to purchase, contact MA for more information. Contact details for the office and for individual staff members at Motorcycling Australia can be found in the MA Information section of the Manual.

Similar to previous editions of the MoMS, new rules or changes for 2017 will appear in bold and rules that have been removed from the previous year will appear as strikethrough. Rules which have been deleted will appear in just one edition as crossed out before deletion and no longer have any current relevance to the GCRs. You should always read deleted rules in context with new and existing regulations to ensure you understand the meaning behind the change.

 

A Year in Review

I feel most certain that I am not the only one out there scratching my head and wondering – where exactly did 2016 go? It seems that just yesterday the MA community were welcoming much needed changes to the organisation as we pushed forward into a new era for the peak body of Australian motorcycle sport.

This push towards a more cohesive and transparent organisation was one challenge that Peter Doyle stepped up to with gusto in 2016, on his acceptance of the top job here as Chief Executive Officer. After what many knew to be a turbulent 12 months, the energy and expertise that Peter brings to the role is clear to everyone. Peter’s motorcycling career spans not less than four decades and from mechanic to motorsport management his face is a familiar one within the industry.

One discipline that is certainly a familiar face on the National Calendar, but hasn’t got the recognition it may have deserved recently is Speedway. Australian riders had great success over their summer season, and certainly notable was Matthew “Happy” Gilmore’s outstanding return to the Speedway World Youth Cup in Europe where he took out the top step of the podium for the second year running.

After a promising first year, Etihad hosted another fantastic display of international Speedway talent in 2016 at the FIM Speedway GP. Australian crowds were overjoyed that our very own Chris Holder took the win, especially after the devastating news that Series title contender Jason Doyle’s injuries resulted in a withdrawal from competition only 1 round from the finale.

In National Championship events, Honda star Troy Herfoss was able to withstand the talented Yamaha riders Glenn Allerton and Wayne Maxwell to secure the title of 2016 ASBK Superbike Champion. However it was with great pleasure that we also had the opportunity to witness two Australian riders compete at MotoGP rounds, and 2015 ASBK Superbike winner Mike Jones supported the international Avintia Ducati team to race at the Grand Prix of Japan, alongside MotoGP regular Jack Miller. Jack Miller wrote himself into history books 7 rounds earlier at the Dutch TT as the 10th youngest winner of any MotoGP or 500cc race at 21 years and 187 days old. He now fits in just behind 9th ranked Casey Stoner.

These results were indicative of yet another group of incredibly competitive Australian riders going to lengths on the FIM International racing circuit, with teams and individuals representing this great country at the Junior Motocross World Championship, Trials des Nations and the International Six Day Enduro (ISDE) amongst many others.

For the fourth consecutive time, the Women’s Trophy Team for the ISDE were outstanding in their capacity to overcome all odds during the event in Spain. Retaining their status as ISDE Champions Tayla Jones was awarded an individual position on the podium position for the EW Class and this amazing trio should be so proud of their achievements both overseas and in Australian competition.

A year for the record books, 2016 also saw Toby Price became the first ever Australian to win the Dakar Rally. An exceptional achievement for only his second year in the competition. The Red Bull KTM rider also went on to secure his fifth title in the bike category for the Finke Desert Race, and his very first podium in the car category, coming in second place as he did the incredible and drove as well as rode the 226km race over 2 days.

Last but not least, MA and the Board would like to acknowledge all of the individuals that give their time  so generously, and in the majority of cases voluntarily, to this sport in order for all of this to happen. The level of participation is a solid indicator of how these events came together in 2016, and how they will be managed as the future of this sport. This includes clubs, coaches, volunteers, riders and their families, all of the officials and of course our State Controlling Bodies.

On behalf of everyone at Motorcycling Australia, Thank You, and I wish you all the best in 2017.

Pete Goddard
Acting President
Motorcycling Australia

Introduction


INTRODUCTION TO THE 2017 EDITION

 

Welcome to Motorcycling Australia’s 2017 Manual of Motorcycle Sport (MoMS), a publication designed to assist you in your riding or officiating throughout the upcoming calendar year.

The Manual of Motorcycle Sport

The MoMS is the motorcycle racing ‘Bible’ and the development and provision of the rules and information within this resource is one of the key functions of Motorcycling Australia (MA). While the information is correct at the time of printing, things can and do change through-out the year. For this reason we urge you to keep an eye on the MA website, where bulletins and updated versions are posted as necessary (www.ma.org.au).

The PDF version of the manual is optimized for use on all your devices for access to the MoMS anywhere, anytime. You have the option to utilize the manual offline, with content available chapter by chapter to download, save and print as required.

As you review this years’ publication of MA’s General Competition Rules, you will notice a number of changes. There has been additional streamlining between chapters, and the inclusion of an easy to use Appendix for sound emissions and fuel. This can be found directly after Chapter 22 and makes a review of the requirements stress-free. This evolution of the MoMS, which will continue to develop into 2018, will make finding the right information much simpler. The structural changes may mean that a particular rule is not where it used to     be but rest assured it will be there and the updated chapter content lists are now even better at directing   you to where specific rules are located. The example of Supplementary Regulations has also been moved exclusively online to ensure everyone has access to the most up-to-date versions. This can be found at www.ma.org.au or contact the MA office for more information.

As a resource for use at events and in all aspects of associated officiating duties, a limited run of printed  hard copy manuals will be distributed to Level 4 Officials. Printed manuals will also be available to purchase, contact MA for more information. Contact details for the office and for individual staff members at Motorcycling Australia can be found in the MA Information section of the Manual.

Similar to previous editions of the MoMS, new rules or changes for 2017 will appear in bold and rules that have been removed from the previous year will appear as strikethrough. Rules which have been deleted will appear in just one edition as crossed out before deletion and no longer have any current relevance to the GCRs. You should always read deleted rules in context with new and existing regulations to ensure you understand the meaning behind the change.

 

A Year in Review

I feel most certain that I am not the only one out there scratching my head and wondering – where exactly did 2016 go? It seems that just yesterday the MA community were welcoming much needed changes to the organisation as we pushed forward into a new era for the peak body of Australian motorcycle sport.

This push towards a more cohesive and transparent organisation was one challenge that Peter Doyle stepped up to with gusto in 2016, on his acceptance of the top job here as Chief Executive Officer. After what many knew to be a turbulent 12 months, the energy and expertise that Peter brings to the role is clear to everyone. Peter’s motorcycling career spans not less than four decades and from mechanic to motorsport management his face is a familiar one within the industry.

One discipline that is certainly a familiar face on the National Calendar, but hasn’t got the recognition it may have deserved recently is Speedway. Australian riders had great success over their summer season, and certainly notable was Matthew “Happy” Gilmore’s outstanding return to the Speedway World Youth Cup in Europe where he took out the top step of the podium for the second year running.

After a promising first year, Etihad hosted another fantastic display of international Speedway talent in 2016 at the FIM Speedway GP. Australian crowds were overjoyed that our very own Chris Holder took the win, especially after the devastating news that Series title contender Jason Doyle’s injuries resulted in a withdrawal from competition only 1 round from the finale.

In National Championship events, Honda star Troy Herfoss was able to withstand the talented Yamaha riders Glenn Allerton and Wayne Maxwell to secure the title of 2016 ASBK Superbike Champion. However it was with great pleasure that we also had the opportunity to witness two Australian riders compete at MotoGP rounds, and 2015 ASBK Superbike winner Mike Jones supported the international Avintia Ducati team to race at the Grand Prix of Japan, alongside MotoGP regular Jack Miller. Jack Miller wrote himself into history books 7 rounds earlier at the Dutch TT as the 10th youngest winner of any MotoGP or 500cc race at 21 years and 187 days old. He now fits in just behind 9th ranked Casey Stoner.

These results were indicative of yet another group of incredibly competitive Australian riders going to lengths on the FIM International racing circuit, with teams and individuals representing this great country at the Junior Motocross World Championship, Trials des Nations and the International Six Day Enduro (ISDE) amongst many others.

For the fourth consecutive time, the Women’s Trophy Team for the ISDE were outstanding in their capacity to overcome all odds during the event in Spain. Retaining their status as ISDE Champions Tayla Jones was awarded an individual position on the podium position for the EW Class and this amazing trio should be so proud of their achievements both overseas and in Australian competition.

A year for the record books, 2016 also saw Toby Price became the first ever Australian to win the Dakar Rally. An exceptional achievement for only his second year in the competition. The Red Bull KTM rider also went on to secure his fifth title in the bike category for the Finke Desert Race, and his very first podium in the car category, coming in second place as he did the incredible and drove as well as rode the 226km race over 2 days.

Last but not least, MA and the Board would like to acknowledge all of the individuals that give their time  so generously, and in the majority of cases voluntarily, to this sport in order for all of this to happen. The level of participation is a solid indicator of how these events came together in 2016, and how they will be managed as the future of this sport. This includes clubs, coaches, volunteers, riders and their families, all of the officials and of course our State Controlling Bodies.

On behalf of everyone at Motorcycling Australia, Thank You, and I wish you all the best in 2017.

Pete Goddard
Acting President
Motorcycling Australia