1. Home

RULES

  1. Introduction
  2. MA Structure
  3. General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes
  4. Jurisdiction s
    1. 1.1 Definitions
    2. 1.2 Purpose of Rules
    3. 1.3 Repeal of Current Gcrs
    4. 1.4 by Laws
  5. Administration s
    1. 2.1 The Controlling Bodies
    2. 2.2 Sports Development Levy
    3. 2.3 Sports Development Account
    4. 2.4 Officials
  6. Licensing s
    1. 3.1 Licensing Requirements
    2. 3.2 Licensing General
    3. 3.3 Licensing Seniors
    4. 3.4 Licensing Juniors
    5. 3.5 Licensing Entrants
    6. 3.6 Licensing Speedway Mechanics
    7. 3.7 Licence Issuing And Renewals
    8. 3.8 Junior Coaching Program
  7. Competitions s
    1. 4.1 Venues
    2. 4.2 The Promotion And Conduct of Competitions
    3. 4.3 MA Events
    4. 4.4 Protocols
  8. Alternative Forms of Competition s
    1. 5.1 Alternative Activities
    2. 5.2 Venues Alternative Activities
    3. 5.3 Permits : Alternative Activities
    4. 5.4 Supplementary Regulations Alternative Activities
    5. 5.5 Licensing of Competitors Alternative Activities
    6. 5.6 Technical Specifications Alternative Activities
  9. Recreational Motorcycle Activity s
    1. 6.1 Purpose
    2. 6.2 Recreational Activities
    3. 6.3 Controlling Bodies Recreational Activities
    4. 6.4 Officials Recreational Activities
    5. 6.5 Venues Recreational Activities
    6. 6.6 The Promotion And Conduct of Recreational Activity
    7. 6.7 Permits Recreational Activities
    8. 6.8 Entries
    9. 6.9 Licensing of Participants
  10. Offences Protests And Appeals s
    1. 7.1 Offences
    2. 7.2 Protests
    3. 7.3 Appellate Bodies
    4. 7.4 Appeals
  11. Judicial Committee Guidelines s
    1. 8.1 MA Hearing Guidelines
  12. National Personal Accident Insurance s
    1. 12.1 Summary of Policy Coverage
    2. 12.2 Capital Benefits
    3. 12.3 Weekly Benefits
    4. 12.4 Definitions
  13. Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 13 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 13 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 13C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 13 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 13 E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SOLO CLASSES
    6. SECTION 13 F: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: SIDECARS
    7. SECTION 13 G: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: JUNIOR CLASSES
    8. SECTION 13 H: MINIMOTO
  14. Historic Road Racing s
    1. SECTION 14 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 14 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 14 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 14 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: GENERAL
    5. SECTION 14E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS: PERIOD
  15. Motocross And Supercross s
    1. SECTION 15 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 15 B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 15 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 15 D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  16. Classic Motocross And Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 16 A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. Section 16 B Competition Classes
    3. SECTION 16 C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 16 D TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  17. Enduro And Reliability Trials s
    1. SECTION 17A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 17B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 17C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 17D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 17E: AUSTRALIAN FOUR-DAY ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIPS
  18. ATV s
    1. SECTION 18A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 18B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 18C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 18D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  19. Speedway s
    1. SECTION 19A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 19B: AUSTRALIAN SPEEDWAY CHAMPIONSHIP
    3. SECTION 19C: AUSTRALIAN TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS
    4. SECTION 19D: COMPETITION RULES
    5. SECTION 19E: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  20. Dirt Track s
    1. SECTION 20A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 20B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 20C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 20D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  21. Track s
    1. SECTION 21A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 21B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 21C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 21D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  22. Supermoto s
    1. SECTION 22A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS
    2. SECTION 22B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. Section 22c Competition Rules
    4. SECTION 22D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  23. Trial s
    1. SECTION 23A: AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP
    2. SECTION 23B: COMPETITION CLASSES
    3. SECTION 23C: COMPETITION RULES
    4. SECTION 23D: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    5. SECTION 23E: CLASS TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
  24. Minikhana s
    1. SECTION 24A: MINIKHANA CLASSES
    2. SECTION 24B: COMPETITION RULES
    3. SECTION 24C: TECHNICAL REGULATIONS
    4. SECTION 24D: MINIKHANA COURSES
  25. Policies s
    1. 25.1 Member Protection Policy
    2. 25.2 Anti-doping Policy
    3. 25.3 Anti Match-fixing Policy
    4. 25.4 Privacy Regulation
    5. 25.5 Occupational Health and Safety Policy
    6. 25.6 Environmental Sustainability Policy
    7. 25.7 National Team Selection Policy

Rules

General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes

THE PHILOSOPHY AND STRUCTURE OF THE GENERAL COMPETITION RULES

The guiding philosophy of these rules is that good sense, cooperation, and fair  and  reasonable  interpretation  of the rules will guide the process of applying these rules to motorcycle sport. The rules and regulations for motorcycle sport in Australia should reflect the way that the sport is conducted. Motorcycling Australia (MA) and the State Controlling Bodies (SCBs) have been careful to ensure that there is a process in place that allows every participant the opportunity to have their say in the way these rules are written.

We actively seek constructive criticism of these Rules and encourage participants to work through their representatives to ensure their relevance.

No set of Rules can anticipate every issue which may arise in the conduct of a sport, especially one with as wide a variety of disciplines and competing interests as exist in motorcycling. The philosophy of these Rules is that good sense, cooperation and a fair and reasonable interpretation of Rules should be more important than “Rule Book Racing”.

In Rule Book Racing, if a situation arises, the answer is to be found by looking up the book, not by the exercise of independent judgment. If there’s no answer in the book, a new rule has to be devised to “plug the hole”. Rule Book Racing assumes that Controlling Bodies have little or no interest in working effectively with competitors, with each other, or  with Promoters to benefit the sport and those who participate in it. It also assumes that officials have no common sense or understanding of the sport. None of these ideas is true or fair.

These rules confer on the Controlling  Bodies  and  their representatives and officials discretion in the application and interpretation of the Rules. It is intended that discretion will be exercised, as stated in the very first rule in this book to ensure that competition is safe, free and fair.

Officials are expected to exercise judgment  wisely  and fairly, on the understanding that if they do not, their decisions, other than those made in the heat of competition, will be subject to review through protest and appeal. They will be trained and encouraged to take responsibility for their actions, and to work in a way which supports the underlying philosophy of the rules.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE MANUAL OF MOTORCYCLE SPORT

This book is divided into 22 chapters.

The first 9 chapters apply to all disciplines of the sport and the rest to the specific disciplines. There will be a degree of crossover from the first section to the specific disciplines and some of the Rules contained in those first chapters need to be added to or varied according to the needs of a particular discipline.

We have attempted to make this edition of the book more user friendly, reinstating an index and reframing every chapter into as  close  to  a  consistent  format as possible. We have also striven to eliminate any ambiguities and contradictions.

 

Chapter 1: Jurisdiction

This chapter states the purposes and principles underlying the Rules. The Rules are to be applied fairly and according to the principles of natural justice. These Rules are binding not only on competitors but also on all Controlling Bodies.

There is a list of definitions which may be useful while using the rest of the Book.

 

Chapter 2: Administration

This very important chapter sets out the authority of the Controlling Bodies. It identifies and empowers the people and the instrumentalities through which the Controlling Bodies exercise their authority.

MA is a member of the FIM, a federation of the controlling bodies of motorcycle sport throughout the world, and MA is a federation of which the SCBs are members. The significance of this that the FIM would not exist without the cooperation and involvement of its members, and the same principle applies to MA.

SCBs agree to be bound by the decisions of MA as part of the agreement they entered into with each other when MA was formed. The SCBs are, in effect, the owners of MA, and their control over MA is exercised through the Board.

The Board has the power under the Articles of Association of MA to make competition Rules.

The Agreements for Conduct of the Sport set out in Rule 2.1.2 is important and typifies the philosophy which underpins these Rules. In providing for the making of agreements, the Rules clear the way for resolving differences among Controlling Bodies and with Promoters, by consultation, discussion and agreement rather than by disputation and resort to a strict and legalistic approach.

The rest of the chapter identifies the roles, responsibilities and limits of authority of various key officials.

 

Chapter 3: Licensing

The primary purpose of having a licensing regime is to ensure the safety of competitors.

This may be applied through separating less experienced competitors from ‘old hands’ and, in the case of junior competition, to ensure that all riders obtain the benefits of a structured coaching process.

Licence holders may not compete at a level higher than their licence allows.

The chapter also sets out the processes by which competitors can obtain a licence, and the means by which applicants can appeal against the refusal of a licence or the imposition of a condition on their licence.

 

Chapter 4: Competitions

The intent of this long chapter is to codify present practices throughout the sport.

Much of the chapter is taken up with establishing the mechanisms for running competitions, and imposing the conditions under which those competitions can take place.

The chapter also deals with breaches of these Rules, and the processes to take place in the event that the Rules are breached.

 

Chapter 5: Alternative Forms of Competition

This chapter is relevant for promoters seeking to conduct  activities  outside  of  mainstream motorcycle sport  such  as  Sand  Drags,  Hill  Climbs,  and   other activities.

 

Chapter 6: Recreational Motorcycle Activity

This chapter seeks to outline the regulation and control required of recreational motorcycle activity sanctioned by MA.

 

Chapter 7: Offences, Protests and Appeals

The application of fair and natural justice is an inherent condition of these rules.

Where participants wish to protest against the actions of an official or another participant, these rules of natural justice require a mechanism for the fair hearing of their protests, which is established in this chapter.

The chapter also sets out the jurisdiction and limits of power of the appellate bodies.

 

Chapter 8: Judicial Committee Guidelines

This chapter sets out the composition of Judicial Committees and also provides a commentary on the process that the Committee undertakes to adjudicate on the matters brought before them.

 

Chapter 9: Personal Accident Insurance

The chapter on insurance is a simple summary of the coverage of MA’s insurance scheme, setting out the benefits available to participants in the sport. The full details of the Personal Accident Insurance Scheme are available in the insurance policy documents.

 

Chapters 10 to 21: Discipline Specific Chapters

As far as possible, the discipline specific chapters follow a common format as follows:

Australian Championships

Competition Classes

Competition Rules

Technical Regulations

 

Chapter 22: Member Protection Policy

This chapter outlines Motorcycling Australia’s member protection policy and includes relevant information such as the code of behaviour and complaints procedures in addition to reporting templates.

 

Appendices

Additional information on protective clothing, equipment and helmets, helmet fitting and flags and signals can be found in the appendices.

 

For clubs and promoters, model supplementary regulations are available on the MA website.

 

RULES AND MAKING RULE CHANGES

Rules change from one year to the next, before they appear in the next edition of the Manual of Motorcycle Sport.

Ever wondered how this happens?

Feedback on current rules is sent through to the relevant Commissions, either through one of the Commissioners themselves, the Commission Chair or relevant MA staff.

Rules are sometimes altered to make the competition easier or fairer, sometimes to reflect new technology  or equipment that has become available. Sometimes rules are altered so that their meaning is made clearer.

Your feedback is encouraged and is always welcome with regards to the rules.

We would like to know about any ways you think we can make the sport better for our competitors.

To put forward a suggested rule amendment or rule inclusion, see the Rule Amendment or Inclusion Form in this manual or on the MA website.

If the relevant Commission decides to pursue this rule feedback further, it will open the issue up to the SCBs and to the general public for comment and discussion.

Depending on the input, the Commission will then either scrap the proposal or make an official recommendation with the wording of change put forward through MA staff.

The suggested rule change is then added onto the agenda of the following Board meeting by the relevant MA staff member.

The MA Board will then decide to accept or reject the proposed rule change.

If rejected, this will be reflected in the Board Minutes, and Board Report – the later which will become available for public viewing at the MA Reports section of the MA website – www.ma.org.au

If accepted, the rule will appear in bold as an amended rule in the Manual of Motorcycle Sport for the following year.

Rules which have been deleted from the previous Manual will appear as crossed out.

 

IMMEDIATE RULE CHANGES

What happens when rules are required to be changed with immediate effect?

There are times – especially at the start of the year, where a rule will need amending or clarification with immediate impact on the current MoMS. When this occurs the same process as above will take place, however, after the Board’s decision, a number of other things will occur.

Initially, MA staff are informed the appropriate rule has been amended and a rule bulletin/media release is created to inform the public of the rule change.

Once created, the bulletin/release gets sent to the relevant Commission Chair/Commissioners so that they can review the wording of the release before it    is made public. Changes to the release at this point can still be made, with Commissioners to suggest appropriate amendments.

Once approved through the Commission, the bulletin/ release can then be sent to the motorcycling public  via email. This release will also be posted immediately onto the MA website.

Further to this, a one-page Rule Change Information Bulletin will be sent out to SCB’s, to on-send to affiliated clubs. This will be done via a standard Rule Change template, so that the club can post this information    on their own relevant bulletin boards. The Information Bulletins will also be posted onto the MA website. An example of the Rule Change Information Bulletin can be found on the next page.

Clubs will have the right to respond and give feedback regarding the rule change via the usual means of communication – sending written feedback to a Commission via the relevant MA staff member.

All rule changes, clarifications; news and information bulletins will be available under the Rules section of the MA website.

General Competition Rules And Making Rule Changes

THE PHILOSOPHY AND STRUCTURE OF THE GENERAL COMPETITION RULES

The guiding philosophy of these rules is that good sense, cooperation, and fair  and  reasonable  interpretation  of the rules will guide the process of applying these rules to motorcycle sport. The rules and regulations for motorcycle sport in Australia should reflect the way that the sport is conducted. Motorcycling Australia (MA) and the State Controlling Bodies (SCBs) have been careful to ensure that there is a process in place that allows every participant the opportunity to have their say in the way these rules are written.

We actively seek constructive criticism of these Rules and encourage participants to work through their representatives to ensure their relevance.

No set of Rules can anticipate every issue which may arise in the conduct of a sport, especially one with as wide a variety of disciplines and competing interests as exist in motorcycling. The philosophy of these Rules is that good sense, cooperation and a fair and reasonable interpretation of Rules should be more important than “Rule Book Racing”.

In Rule Book Racing, if a situation arises, the answer is to be found by looking up the book, not by the exercise of independent judgment. If there’s no answer in the book, a new rule has to be devised to “plug the hole”. Rule Book Racing assumes that Controlling Bodies have little or no interest in working effectively with competitors, with each other, or  with Promoters to benefit the sport and those who participate in it. It also assumes that officials have no common sense or understanding of the sport. None of these ideas is true or fair.

These rules confer on the Controlling  Bodies  and  their representatives and officials discretion in the application and interpretation of the Rules. It is intended that discretion will be exercised, as stated in the very first rule in this book to ensure that competition is safe, free and fair.

Officials are expected to exercise judgment  wisely  and fairly, on the understanding that if they do not, their decisions, other than those made in the heat of competition, will be subject to review through protest and appeal. They will be trained and encouraged to take responsibility for their actions, and to work in a way which supports the underlying philosophy of the rules.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE MANUAL OF MOTORCYCLE SPORT

This book is divided into 22 chapters.

The first 9 chapters apply to all disciplines of the sport and the rest to the specific disciplines. There will be a degree of crossover from the first section to the specific disciplines and some of the Rules contained in those first chapters need to be added to or varied according to the needs of a particular discipline.

We have attempted to make this edition of the book more user friendly, reinstating an index and reframing every chapter into as  close  to  a  consistent  format as possible. We have also striven to eliminate any ambiguities and contradictions.

 

Chapter 1: Jurisdiction

This chapter states the purposes and principles underlying the Rules. The Rules are to be applied fairly and according to the principles of natural justice. These Rules are binding not only on competitors but also on all Controlling Bodies.

There is a list of definitions which may be useful while using the rest of the Book.

 

Chapter 2: Administration

This very important chapter sets out the authority of the Controlling Bodies. It identifies and empowers the people and the instrumentalities through which the Controlling Bodies exercise their authority.

MA is a member of the FIM, a federation of the controlling bodies of motorcycle sport throughout the world, and MA is a federation of which the SCBs are members. The significance of this that the FIM would not exist without the cooperation and involvement of its members, and the same principle applies to MA.

SCBs agree to be bound by the decisions of MA as part of the agreement they entered into with each other when MA was formed. The SCBs are, in effect, the owners of MA, and their control over MA is exercised through the Board.

The Board has the power under the Articles of Association of MA to make competition Rules.

The Agreements for Conduct of the Sport set out in Rule 2.1.2 is important and typifies the philosophy which underpins these Rules. In providing for the making of agreements, the Rules clear the way for resolving differences among Controlling Bodies and with Promoters, by consultation, discussion and agreement rather than by disputation and resort to a strict and legalistic approach.

The rest of the chapter identifies the roles, responsibilities and limits of authority of various key officials.

 

Chapter 3: Licensing

The primary purpose of having a licensing regime is to ensure the safety of competitors.

This may be applied through separating less experienced competitors from ‘old hands’ and, in the case of junior competition, to ensure that all riders obtain the benefits of a structured coaching process.

Licence holders may not compete at a level higher than their licence allows.

The chapter also sets out the processes by which competitors can obtain a licence, and the means by which applicants can appeal against the refusal of a licence or the imposition of a condition on their licence.

 

Chapter 4: Competitions

The intent of this long chapter is to codify present practices throughout the sport.

Much of the chapter is taken up with establishing the mechanisms for running competitions, and imposing the conditions under which those competitions can take place.

The chapter also deals with breaches of these Rules, and the processes to take place in the event that the Rules are breached.

 

Chapter 5: Alternative Forms of Competition

This chapter is relevant for promoters seeking to conduct  activities  outside  of  mainstream motorcycle sport  such  as  Sand  Drags,  Hill  Climbs,  and   other activities.

 

Chapter 6: Recreational Motorcycle Activity

This chapter seeks to outline the regulation and control required of recreational motorcycle activity sanctioned by MA.

 

Chapter 7: Offences, Protests and Appeals

The application of fair and natural justice is an inherent condition of these rules.

Where participants wish to protest against the actions of an official or another participant, these rules of natural justice require a mechanism for the fair hearing of their protests, which is established in this chapter.

The chapter also sets out the jurisdiction and limits of power of the appellate bodies.

 

Chapter 8: Judicial Committee Guidelines

This chapter sets out the composition of Judicial Committees and also provides a commentary on the process that the Committee undertakes to adjudicate on the matters brought before them.

 

Chapter 9: Personal Accident Insurance

The chapter on insurance is a simple summary of the coverage of MA’s insurance scheme, setting out the benefits available to participants in the sport. The full details of the Personal Accident Insurance Scheme are available in the insurance policy documents.

 

Chapters 10 to 21: Discipline Specific Chapters

As far as possible, the discipline specific chapters follow a common format as follows:

Australian Championships

Competition Classes

Competition Rules

Technical Regulations

 

Chapter 22: Member Protection Policy

This chapter outlines Motorcycling Australia’s member protection policy and includes relevant information such as the code of behaviour and complaints procedures in addition to reporting templates.

 

Appendices

Additional information on protective clothing, equipment and helmets, helmet fitting and flags and signals can be found in the appendices.

 

For clubs and promoters, model supplementary regulations are available on the MA website.

 

RULES AND MAKING RULE CHANGES

Rules change from one year to the next, before they appear in the next edition of the Manual of Motorcycle Sport.

Ever wondered how this happens?

Feedback on current rules is sent through to the relevant Commissions, either through one of the Commissioners themselves, the Commission Chair or relevant MA staff.

Rules are sometimes altered to make the competition easier or fairer, sometimes to reflect new technology  or equipment that has become available. Sometimes rules are altered so that their meaning is made clearer.

Your feedback is encouraged and is always welcome with regards to the rules.

We would like to know about any ways you think we can make the sport better for our competitors.

To put forward a suggested rule amendment or rule inclusion, see the Rule Amendment or Inclusion Form in this manual or on the MA website.

If the relevant Commission decides to pursue this rule feedback further, it will open the issue up to the SCBs and to the general public for comment and discussion.

Depending on the input, the Commission will then either scrap the proposal or make an official recommendation with the wording of change put forward through MA staff.

The suggested rule change is then added onto the agenda of the following Board meeting by the relevant MA staff member.

The MA Board will then decide to accept or reject the proposed rule change.

If rejected, this will be reflected in the Board Minutes, and Board Report – the later which will become available for public viewing at the MA Reports section of the MA website – www.ma.org.au

If accepted, the rule will appear in bold as an amended rule in the Manual of Motorcycle Sport for the following year.

Rules which have been deleted from the previous Manual will appear as crossed out.

 

IMMEDIATE RULE CHANGES

What happens when rules are required to be changed with immediate effect?

There are times – especially at the start of the year, where a rule will need amending or clarification with immediate impact on the current MoMS. When this occurs the same process as above will take place, however, after the Board’s decision, a number of other things will occur.

Initially, MA staff are informed the appropriate rule has been amended and a rule bulletin/media release is created to inform the public of the rule change.

Once created, the bulletin/release gets sent to the relevant Commission Chair/Commissioners so that they can review the wording of the release before it    is made public. Changes to the release at this point can still be made, with Commissioners to suggest appropriate amendments.

Once approved through the Commission, the bulletin/ release can then be sent to the motorcycling public  via email. This release will also be posted immediately onto the MA website.

Further to this, a one-page Rule Change Information Bulletin will be sent out to SCB’s, to on-send to affiliated clubs. This will be done via a standard Rule Change template, so that the club can post this information    on their own relevant bulletin boards. The Information Bulletins will also be posted onto the MA website. An example of the Rule Change Information Bulletin can be found on the next page.

Clubs will have the right to respond and give feedback regarding the rule change via the usual means of communication – sending written feedback to a Commission via the relevant MA staff member.

All rule changes, clarifications; news and information bulletins will be available under the Rules section of the MA website.